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Buying ethically doesn’t have to cost an arm and a leg.

One of the biggest qualms fashionistas have about ethical fashion is that it costs too much and that it isn’t affordable for the masses. Compared to the ultra-low price alternative of fast fashion, this is likely true. However, maybe our view on what is affordable and what isn’t is skewed in the first place.

Given the high environmental and social impact the production of fast fashion has, maybe the cost of ethical fashion is the actuality of what fashion should cost. If paying people fair wages and treating them ethically, providing communities with opportunities to grow and protecting the environment means our clothes cost a more realistic value, is this not a fair price to pay?

If we only bought clothes and accessories when we need them (and not just when we see something with a really low price tag), ethical fashion would likely not cost us extra. In fact, by adopting a quality over quantity ideology, maybe we would actually save money.

How do we do this? Some ideas include:

· Focusing less on seasonality and more on items that can be worn year-round

· Trading clothes with friends or buying second-hand

· Purchasing clothes that are made from materials that do not wear out easily and caring  for your existing clothing in the proper manner

· Considering your wants versus your needs when it comes to fashion

Last but not least, changing of mindset around affordability of ethical fashion requires active discussion, debate and advocacy. Ethical fashion does not have to cost an arm and a leg, and it’s a matter of changing perspectives for us to realize that.

Minimalist clutch-2

Consider buying accessories that can work well with clothing for all seasons, like this neutral envelope clutch that pairs well with a jacket or a lighter summer outfit

 

 

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